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Digital Jury Resources

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JURY SLIDE PHOTOGRAPHY

Fixing Problem Jury Images

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Recent examples of artwork and booth images I've improved. In some cases I walk the artist through photographing their own work to get me a good enough image for my post processing to make it look as though it was professionally photographed. In other cases, I improve images provided by professional photographers. In all cases, the artist has a better chance of getting into the shows that they apply to.

For most images I charge $20 per image. For images where the background is changed and shadowing added, the cost is $85 per image. Please call me in advance to discuss it so there is no confusion.
You'll also notice that in some examples, I've included the borders that square the images. By preparing images that meet 1920x1920 ZAPP format, it's the only way to insure that the jurors will see your images exactly as you've uploaded them without any changes. If you upload other size or non square images, ZAPP will square them, and sizes other than 1920 will appear smaller to the jurors when projected.

Additionally, check out examples of my jury slide photography

Proper shadows make it look real - read my article

call for more information 412-401-8100

improved images of artwork taken at art shows

More Examples of Improved Booth Images

   
Besides the original photograph of this painting being way too dark, terrible specular highlights from on camera flash became evident when the image was lightened to look accurate. I guess it could have been worse had an iphone been used.
Picture of artwork taken at an art show. Added a background and shadowing as if it were photographed in a studio.
The diagonal gradient didn't cut it, especially since each image in the set looked like it had a different background.

Almost impossible to tell it's a table in the short period of time the jurors get to evaluate the images. But changing the background allowed the sculptural piece to be understood immediately.

Originally photographed in a natural setting made it difficult to see the details of this sculptural clock. The graduated background accenting the shape draw your eye directly to the clock and make it's features really pop.
Don't you just hate it when your only booth picture has the back door open, the name sign provided by the show, and dead grass.
The artist provided images taken on a black background. When the background was changed, the objects came to life.
The artist was working with me to take a clean booth picture, setting up the booth in their backyard, going back and fourth making changes I suggested. By the time the final composition was arrived at, light was running out but I was still able to make the glass look translucent.
Rescuing a picture of artwork taken at an art show, adding a background and shadowing as if it were photographed in a studio.
Originally photographed on a dark background made it next to impossible to see the features of this glass sculpture. The lighter background with correct shadowing and halo made the features really pop.
Photographed on a similar toned background as the glass bottle made it impossible to see the stopper until the background was changed to make the glass pop.
Rescuing a picture of artwork taken at an art show, adding a background and shadowing as if it were photographed in a studio.
Hot spots were removed and the piece was color corrected. Then the background was changed so the work really pops.
Hazy morning light transformed into beautiful saturated colors. The distractions (chair, weights, mirror and through the back of the canopy) were eliminated.
The piece was photographed by the artist on black fabric but not enough light was used. Contrast and brightness were corrected and it was dropped into a graduated background with proper shadowing to make it look as if it were photographed that way.
The banner and all the other distractions, including the background in the hall seen above the booth was removed, and the draping turned opaque.. A really clean booth picture with no distractions was the result.
The bead was originally photographed by the artist. Color and brightness were corrected. Then the bead was extracted and a graduated background and shadowing was added to make it pop.
Color and brightness were corrected. Then the booth was cropped and the transluency was taken out of the walls. A really clean booth picture was the result.
Originally photographed in the artist's booth, it was color corrected, the hot spots were eliminated and then it was dropped into a background with shadowing that accented the piece. Additionally the base, which was cut off in the original photograph, was completed.
The sculpture and stand were taken out of the booth and then new artwork was added to the walls. The distracting lighter area under the panels was also fixed.
After adjusting the contrast and brightness, it was color correct to bring back the original yellow color of the beads and feather. The darker background behind the feather brought back the translucence that the feather originally had. Once the new background and shadowing was added, the piece became dynamic.
Contrast and color adjusted and hot spots removed. Then the earrings were taken out of their setting and dropped into a backgroud that accents the shapes, and shadowing was added.
A booth filled with mirrors. Besides fixing the floor and thelight coming in under the display panels, all the mirrors were selected and a neutral non distracting gradient dropped in. They still look like mirrors but don't take away from the artwork.
Talk about blindingly white. Jury pieces should never be photographed on a white background because it blinds the jurors, especially if you want them to see detail in the jewelry. And if the artist that follows the images on white has had their work photographed properly, the jurors eye's haven't adjusted so the next artist suffers also.
Originally shot in a gallery, it was color corrected and the background was changed to make it look like it was taken in a photographers studio.
Originally shot in the booth, it was color corrected and the background was changed to make it look like it was taken in a photographers studio.
The original is washed out and it's difficult taking your eyes off the model's face. Color correction and cropping makes a world of a difference.

Too large for the background. The piece was extracted and a background added to match previously photographed furniture.

Canvas was added to the bottom to establish the parameters of the background. The base was finished and the piece extracted from the background and dropped into a graduated background with shadowing that accented the shape of the piece.

Color corrected, cropped and a neutral background added

The original was shot in an outdoor setting. It was cropped, color corrected and extracted from the background. Then a gradient background that accented the shape of the coat was added to make it look as if it were photographed in a studio.

The improved color and the lighter background, now visible through the bench, really makes it pop.

Guess where the artist shot the original picture.

Look at the difference a simple color adjustment and crop can make

The original was provided by the artist. The background wasn't wide enough. I also adjusted color and contrast.

The original was provided by the artist. First I color corrected it and eliminated hot spots. Then it was cut out and dropped into a neutral background that made the piece pop.

Original was provided by the artist. The background was changed to a neutral color so that the color of the table and leaves would pop. Notice the background visible through the glass table top.

I originally photographed the lamp on white to show transparency in the lucite. The lamp was then dropped into a graduated background to give it impact while still retaining the sense of transparency.

Originally photographed by the artist at an art show.

The original was photographed by the artist (visible in the reflection through the necklace) and then cut out and dropped into a neutral background.

Things that were most noticeable about the original image was the model's eyes, pale skin tone, and lots of empty space. I cropped and corrected the skin tone as much as I could working from the original full size image.

Each panel was prepared individually and then color corrected to match and dropped into a 1920 black canvas

This piece was photographed for the purpose of changing backgrounds.

I originally shot this piece on white. Two years later the artist asked me to change the background to graduated to match the new work.

The photographer provided the artist uncropped images in the wrong color space

Color correction and cropping significantly improved this image of a glass vessel.

Originally photographed in the artist's booth at a show, the piece was extracted, color corrected and dropped into a graduated background.

Off with her head. Then the background was changed to make the piece come forward instead of recede into the background. The cropping made the work more impressive.

This piece was photographed for the purpose of changing backgrounds.

Booth Examples

   

Replacing artwork in a two dimensional booth, I originally asked the artist to photograph their booth with empty frames.

more articles on booth pictures

Taking the wrinkles out

Examples of my Jury Slide Photography

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